All I want for Christmas is WEALTH

Maybe you watched Gentlemen prefer blonds and heard Marilyn Monroe sing ‘Diamonds are a girls best friend’? Or maybe you watch Charlie Brown and know that Lucy always wants real estate as a gift? Materialistically speaking, what DO you want for Christmas? Many would choose wealth. But how can you give the gift of wealth?

Money is universally usable, but not a very thoughtful gift. Some like to give or get gift cards, but they mainly benefit the retailers behind them.

Lottery tickets have become a frequent stocking stuffer gifts – who wouldn’t want a chance on million or two? Plus, they are much less expensive than toys or chocolates for the giver. But we all know the chance of winning the jackpot are astronomically against us.

If you want to give (or have) a chance at real wealth, there must be a better method.

One of those is to find and follow someone who has already traveled the road to wealth and is willing and able to put up signposts to help guide you as you travel on your wealth journey.

So, what do you do – walk around looking for a millionaire? I’m afraid you would have doubtful success. Even if you did stumble on one, she probably won’t be announcing to the world that she has money.

Maybe you are wealthy and feel that you could share your own experiences to help someone else down the road to wealth, yet often our offspring ignore or reject our advice and need to hear the wealth story from someone else.

For Christmas this year why not let me share the story of my road to wealth with your son, daughter, grandson, granddaughter, son-in-law or daughter-in-law, niece or nephew?

Jamaca beach flattenedThe book “Choose Wealth – Be a Millionaire by Midlife” is precisely that. In it I tell the story of my journey, including my successes, mistakes and suggestions on getting there faster than I was able.

Buy Now.  For just $9.99 you can give the gift that may lead to wealth!

You don’t have to be a best selling author, a rock star musician, a tech guru wizard or a high powered lawyer to be a multimillionaire, you just need time and persistence. Anyone can do it if they know how. YOU can do it if you want it badly enough, learn how and persist. You just have to choose to be wealthy. This book helps you figure out how to choose wealth.

My goal in writing this book is to show you through story and fact that it is entirely possible for most people to build a net worth of several million dollars by midlife. I hope to inspire you. I want to help you understand and identify what prevents you from traveling the road to wealth. I want to share some of the many excuses people have for never achieving wealth and show you how to avoid the excuse trap.

You’ll read about my unique Framework for Wealth which covers

  • learning more about environments other than yours;
  • finding your dream;
  • making the most of your education & getting a good start in life;
  • how ordinary people overcame great obstacles;
  • how to learn to discuss money;
  • things you should know about personal finance and resources to learn what you don’t know yet;
  • how to leverage your time and your money better;
  • ideas on learning how to be and practice the persistence needed to build your net worth;
  • ways to keep from losing hope
  • how to find a millionaire mentor and
  • a list of resources I have used and found helpful.

I’ve used my own story and struggles, along with all of my research – all of the books I’ve read, classes I’ve taken and conversations I’ve had about wealth – as a basis to form this framework for you to use to build your own net worth into a million-dollar fortune.

My spouse and I were millionaires before age 50, but it was a long, hard road to get there. I wrote Choose Wealth – Be a Millionaire by Midlife to help you get there faster.

Buy Now.  For just $9.99 you get the book and more!

IMG_1394smPlus, as an added bonus, you will receive free with your order, a board game I created in 2014 called Toothpaste Millions.

You can print the parts on your home printer and use tokens you already have at home for the parts.

This game, designed for use in my Grandma Rie’s Money Camp with my two grandchildren, is geared for 2-4 players aged 10 and up. It reinforces business concepts, demonstrates the fact that your decisions influence your success or failure and also helps players practice math skills.

Included in the package to print are the rules, game board, play money, and the game cards. To play, you will need to supply dice, tokens, a calculator and pencils.

Buy Now For just $9.99 for the book, the printable game and the below!

In addition, you will also receive free of charge, 3 of my Whinny Series financial fables.

Whinny makes a change.

Whinny cover bk 1 copy

Financial fables (of which this book is one) are short tales – often using animals to teach a moral or lesson about money and finances.

As part of my efforts to help bring financial literacy to the next generation, the Whinny Series of financial fables joins a universal girl favorite (horses) with stories of self sufficiency, learning to earn, moving ahead and dealing with all the expensive things life can throw at us.

Whinny Makes a Change is the first story in the series. In it, Whinny looks beyond her home environment to see the other possibilities the world offers. Knowing that you can do something different than what has always been done is an important lesson to learn, one that can help propel you into a satisfying and lucrative career.

When you read this fable to your youngster, take the time to ask her penetrating questions relating to your own lives; point out others in your circle that have broken from a non-working model and succeeded in a new endeavor. Talk about how sometimes doing something new seems scary, but once you have started, gets less so. Point out the planning that Whinny did and help your youngster understand that things don’t just magically happen – having a plan in place is key to many successes.

Whinny Learns to Earn

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Whinny Learns to Earn is the story of how Whinny overcomes the obstacles and challenges inherit in becoming a real police horse. Often young people believe that getting their education and landing that first job offer or starting that first business is all it takes and are surprised at how much they yet have to learn about doing the job or running their business.

When you read this fable to your youngster, take the time to ask her penetrating questions relating to your own lives; tell your child the challenges and opportunities you encountered on your path up the career ladder. Talk about how lifetime learning can benefit him or her both financially and spiritually. Point out the surprises that Whinny encountered and show how she overcame her fears and learned what was needed to get the job done.

Whinny Starts Work

Whinny cover bk 3 copy

Whinny Starts Work is the third story in the series. In it, Whinny has finished training to become a police mount but then discovers that there is so much more to learn than what was taught in school

When you read this fable to your youngster, take the time to ask her penetrating questions relating to your own lives; mention your own experience in finding out that you didn’t learn everything in school. Ask your child if there was a time that they learned something outside of school. Talk about how tired Whinny got of learning new things all the time, but then how proud she was when she put that learning to use.

Give the gift of wealth, for adults, tweens or kids – all for just $9.99. Offer ends December 30, 2015.

How to buy.

Just email using our contact form if you would like to purchase the book and receive the bonus gift of the board game and the 3 Whinny financial fables and I will invoice you from Paypal for the payment.  You can pay with credit card or Paypal balance. Following payment receipt I will email the pdf and files to the email address making the payment.

OR, to receive just the book, buy on Amazon.

Have a happy, healthy and PROSPEROUS New Year.

 

2015 Grandma Rie’s Money Camp Activities and Resources

Teaching the next generation to successfully handle money and personal finances is normally a family responsibility. Although parents bear much of the burden to teach, train and model good personal finance, extended family members can also contribute.

Although my grown children do very well in the personal finance arena, they learned from us by osmosis, without any special or formal training by my spouse or I. When they presented me with grandchildren, I vowed that I would take an active part in teaching financial literacy to them.

As a result, I started a one week ‘Grandma Rie’s Money Camp’ in 2011 and held our fifth annual one this year.

Hiccups in this years plan.

My plans for this years camp were quite extensive. The grandkids are reaching the tween and near tween stage and have a greater capacity to soak up some of the information. I spent quite a while developing the plans for camp, but then, as usual, things changed and I had to be nimble in tailoring the plans to reality. Continue reading

Poor Financial Lessons Parents Are Inadvertently Teaching Their Kids

Parents are often referred to as the first teachers in their child’s life. It is the responsibility of parents and supporting family members to provide a solid foundation from which their children can learn to live life. While most families try the best they can to teach their children the properly, sometimes they inadvertently pass on poor habits and traits that follow their children right through adulthood. One area in which parents unknowingly teach poor habits is personal finance.

When it comes to personal finances, many adults are unaware of how to handle them properly. It is not until something goes terribly wrong that the need to learn on how to effectively manage personal finances come into place, however, by this point your children have already absorbed a great deal of what your actions have shown. Below are a few lessons you may be unconsciously teaching your children about finances. Continue reading

Grandma Rie’s 2015 Money Camp Plans

Teaching the next generation to successfully handle money and personal finances is normally a family responsibility. Although parents bear much of the burden to teach, train and model good personal finance, extended family members can also contribute.

Although my grown children do very well in the personal finance arena, they learned from us by osmosis, without any special or formal training by my spouse or I. When they presented me with grandchildren, I vowed that I would take an active part in teaching financial literacy to them.

As a result, I started a one week ‘Grandma Rie’s Money Camp’ in 2011 and held our fourth annual one this year.

Background.

This year’s camp will held just for the two grandchildren, a boy just 11 and a girl almost 8. My grandchildren’s other Grandma will participate with me in this years camp.

Long range planning

Earlier this year, I sat down and thought about the long range goals of our Money Camp. Before I know it the kids will be teens and not very interested in going to a Grandma camp with their precious time. However, as long as there is interest I plan to continue.

From basic concepts about currency identification and value to more esoteric topics such as the psychology of money, I jotted down the things I felt were important to pass along to our next generation. I gleaned some of my ideas from books such as The Young Investor by Katherine R. Bateman, Raising Financially Fit Kids by Joline Godfrey and Granddad’s Money Camp by Dr. George H. Meyers. Other’s came from discussions in our family meeting about what our family values are and still others from things I felt I had lacked or had neglected to teach my own children before they grew up. Continue reading

Money in Your Twenties, What Would You Do Differently?

 

1956 calendar

This week I had an inquiry from Jackie, asking what I did successfully in my 20’s and if I could go back in time, what would I do differently – saying:

“Your 20s are typically the perfect time to start planning for retirement, but sometimes life gets in the way.

What did you do successfully in your 20s, or if you could go back in time, is there anything you would have done differently to ensure a better financial future sooner in life?

In a post on Family Money Values, I would love to hear your thoughts on how you could have built your financial safety net in your 20s better–and how you can start it now if you haven’t already. What would be your ideal retire at 65 plan?”

In answer to that, I’m going to repeat part of the story I told in my book Choose Wealth! Be a millionaire by midlife. In Chapter 4, I talk about my journey to becoming a millionaire, particularly some of the mistakes I made in my youth. Continue reading

How to Teach Kids to Sell

teach kids to sellAlong with financial literacy, I think that we all need to learn effective selling techniques.

Teaching how to sell is something that school typically doesn’t cover (even though many schools ask kids to sell in their fundraisers!). Many of our parents don’t feel comfortable teaching their kids how to sell (because they don’t think they know how). Sometimes people think of selling as sleazy and high pressure and don’t really think they SHOULD teach their children how. Continue reading